How to Build a Fire

Lighting a fire is only half the battle. The way you build a fire – that is, how you arrange the wood – can affect how long the fire will last and the amount of heat it’ll give off during that time. This article will provide an overview of how to build a fire in any setting.


Part 1 of 2: Gathering What You Need

1. Get an ignition source. The most obvious choice is a lighter or matches, but if you’re in a pinch, try one of these ideas:
How to Create Fire With a Magnifying Glass
How to Light Wet Matches (or if you’re proactive, Make Waterproof Matches)
How to Identify Flint so you can Start a Fire With Magnesium and Flint
How to Start a Fire with Sticks
How to Make Fire Without Matches or a Lighter

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2. Gather tinder. Tinder catches the initial spark from the ignition source and transfers it to the kindling. If the kindling is damp or wet, the tinder must burn long enough to dry out the kindling.
You can turn dry sticks and pieces of bark into powdery tinder with a knife.
Other sources of tinder include:
dead dry plants and grasses
wax
lint
birch bark
charcloth
moss
wood shavings
paper
pine pitch
dry needles from coniferous trees
fire sticks
dry leaves
fire starters

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3. Gather kindling. Kindling needs a large surface to volume ratio (about 1/8″ to 1/2″ diameter) and more bulk than tinder so it can ignite easily, produce sustained concentrated heat and flame, and light the main fuel source.

  • Good sources: dry twigs and wood pieces, cardboard, large pieces of wood cut into small pieces, and fuzz sticks (sticks with shavings cut into them, but still attached).
  • If you need to split small pieces of wood into smaller pieces for kindling, try these methods:
    • Hold the wood you want to split parallel to the axe, with the top of the stick touching the axe blade. Both your hands are near the bottom of the axe handle: one holding the ax, and the other holding the stick. With the stick touching the axe blade where you want it to split, swing both the stick and the axe together to hit the chopping block. When the axe splits the stick, give it a twist to finish splitting the stick into two pieces.
    • To split a small piece of wood, hold the stick upright, either by sticking into the ground or holding it with your feet. Take a rock a little bigger than your fist, and smack the end of the stick with the rock until a crack has been created. Peel the layers back with your fingers to split the wood into smaller pieces.

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4. Gather logs or other bulky fuel sources. Good fuels for sustained burning include dry wood that is 1″ to 5″ (2.5 cm to 12.5 cm) in diameter, twisted dry grasses, peat, dried animal dung and coal. Gather more fuel than you think you’ll need, especially if you’re going to sleep by the fire.
Green or wet fuel can be used, but only once the fire is established because it will burn more slowly than dry fuel.
Softwoods/conifers/evergreens have leaves in the shape of needles. They burn quickly and very hot, and they also contain flammable resins which burn hotter and help with starting a fire. Because of this, they’re often used for kindling as well, since they’re easier to ignite than hardwoods. You will know if you are using a wood with resin because it crackles and pops while burning.
Hardwoods have broad flat leaves and they don’t catch fire as easily as softwoods. Once they do, however, they burn for a longer period of time and give off more heat. It may be necessary to know How to Split Hardwood Firewood or How to Split Gnarly Firewood
You can also Make Logs from Newspapers.

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Part 2 of 2: Building the Actual Fire

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1. Clear a circular area about 4 feet (1.2 m) in diameter. Build a ring of rocks or dig a fire pit that’s several inches deep using a shovel or hand trowel. Constructing a ring of stones will insulate the fire. Building a firewall with logs or rocks will reflect the fire’s heat, especially if you’ll only be on one side of the fire (because otherwise the heat sent off in the other direction is wasted).
If the ground is wet or covered with snow, build a platform out of green logs and cover them with a layer of earth or stones.

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2. Pile kindling loosely in your fire ring or fire pit. You want your kindling close enough to ignite but spaced enough for good air circulation.
Place your tinder on the pile of kindling. Light the fire with your ignition source and gradually add more kindling.

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Slowly blow air on the igniting fire to build heat and intensity.

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3. Add firewood starting with the smallest sized pieces and working your way up toward large pieces. The arrangement you choose will determine the fire’s longevity, how fast it burns, and how long your wood lasts.
Build a tepee. Arrange the tinder and a few sticks of kindling in the shape of a cone, and light them at the center. The outside logs will fall inward and feed the fire. This is the most effective of all fire arrangements.

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4. Finished.

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Sources and Citations : http://www.wikihow.com